10 Interesting Facts About the Lord’s Prayer
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10 Interesting Facts About the Lord’s Prayer

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The Lord’s Prayer, commonly known as the Our Father or Pater Noster, is one of the most iconic and well-known prayers in Christianity. It was likely written in Hebrew around the 1st century AD and was later translated into other languages such as Greek and Latin. It’s the prayer that Jesus taught his disciples to pray and it’s been used since then by billions of Christians worldwide. Let’s take a look at some of the facts about this famous prayer.

The history of the Lord’s Prayer


While it may be impossible to pinpoint when and where Christians began reciting and praying these words, scholars are in general agreement that both of these practices have a long history. For one thing, many Bible scholars believe that there is a certain poetic quality about these few short sentences that makes them more likely to have been uttered by Jesus himself than any other set of words in all of Scripture. Furthermore, several early Christian leaders such as St. Basil (AD 330-379) wrote about reciting and praying these five prayers every day; as did St. Augustine (AD 354-430). However, neither Augustine nor Basil claimed to know for sure who originally composed or said them first. According to tradition, Christ taught his disciples to pray using a longer version of what we now call The Lord’s Prayer. They later passed those teachings on from generation to generation until they became what we see today.

The Larger Context


As is often the case with scriptures, we know Jesus spoke in Aramaic—not English. And there are only a handful of places where that original language has been preserved. Matthew 6:9-13 is one of them. It’s important to note that when you read our Lord’s Prayer in English, you’re not reading it as it was written down thousands of years ago—in fact, you’re not even reading it as Jesus spoke it, because we don’t have a copy of what He said. There are many instances where translations and transliterations differ significantly from source to source and from Bible to Bible. This issue gets especially tricky around passages like The Lord’s Prayer, which are best known for their ubiquity. People of faith hear these words so much in church or at home that they become familiar before they ever learn anything about their meaning or history. That familiarity then means The Lord’s Prayer likely sounds more familiar than any other passage because most people quote it as if they themselves wrote it instead of attributing its authorship to anyone but God Himself (or perhaps Luke). For those reasons, then, let me make clear my own translation above may sound strange to some Christians and others who know the prayer well; I included brackets [ ] around both Our Father and Amen below specifically for these reasons.

Jesus Prays this To His Father


The Lord’s prayer is a prayer mentioned in all four Gospels. It’s Jesus’ teaching on how his followers should pray to God. But did you know that its origins predate Jesus? Here are 10 interesting facts about one of Christianity’s most well-known prayers , according to Catholic Online: 1) Historically, there have been two versions of the Lord’s Prayer, both written in Greek (the original language), and both by an unknown author. One version was used throughout early Christian history; it appears as part of Justin Martyr’s Dialogue with Trypho, a Jew and as quoted by Clement of Alexandria; today it is better known as The Lord’s Prayer I: Our Father who art in heaven. 2) A second Lord’s Prayer, The Lord’s Prayer II, is found in late Christian writings such as The Letter of Barnabas, 3) Basilides 4) Tatian 5). It includes additional material concerning prosperity and damnation: 6)… from now on may your Kingdom come…may your will be done…give us each day our daily bread…do not bring us into temptation… 7)… lead us not into temptation…deliver us from evil… 8)… for yours is the power and glory forever… 9). …in which he says to himself Your kingdom come over those things he wants and your will be done over those things he does not want. 10) After Jesus finished praying, he bowed his head and gave up his spirit. Following Jesus’ death, some disciples remembered these words when others forgot them; others refused to accept their meaning. This fact could indicate one origin of why we recite a modified form of Lord’s Prayer at Mass during Holy Communion: Through Him, with Him, in Him. In Christ We Have Victory! In Christ We Have Life Eternal! Amen! Let Us Break Bread Together And Drink From Our Chalice Of Salvation. To Remember His Sacrifice On Our Behalf And As He Commands Truly Make Them Holy So That We May Be Holy And Blessed By His Grace Amen!

Understanding The Original Language


First and foremost, it’s important to note that The Lord’s Prayer is a translation of a Bible verse and not originally written in English. The Bible says Jesus offered up a single prayer to his father, who is God. Since Jesus was a Hebrew, he would have prayed in Hebrew. Therefore, when you recite The Lord’s Prayer, you are saying his exact words (translated into English) nearly 2,000 years later. We can learn more about Jesus by exploring different translations of The Lord’s Prayer. For example, some versions refer to thy kingdom come on earth as it is in heaven, while others say on earth as in heaven. Some use daily bread and others say bread every day. And some versions include lead us not into temptation, while others say do not bring us to trial. These differences reflect ongoing conversation about what Christ really meant or if we’re taking liberties with our modern-day interpretation. While we cannot be certain which version most closely reflects Jesus’ actual prayer for mankind today, these differences force Christians and people of other faiths alike to ponder several important questions: What did Jesus mean?

How Many Versions Are There?


While most of us are familiar with The Lord’s Prayer, there are actually many versions of it. Different Christian sects translate some parts differently than others, including how they refer to God. Some versions include statements such as thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven while others have a more direct translation, like your kingdom come, your will be done. There are other differences between translations as well: some include additional requests and petitions that others do not include at all. Which version you use depends largely on your religious background and preference—you may even want to try them all!

When Were The Verses Divided Into Two Sections?


The most commonly used translation of The Lord’s Prayer (Our Father, who art in heaven…) divides it into two sections: (1) Our Father in heaven, hallowed be your name; your kingdom come, your will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us today our daily bread; and forgive us our debts, as we also have forgiven our debtors. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. For yours is the kingdom and the power and the glory forever. Amen. (2) For if you forgive men when they sin against you, your heavenly Father will also forgive you. But if you do not forgive men their sins, your Father will not forgive your sins. Matthew 6:9-15 In Luke 11:2-4 a similar passage occurs with slight variations between that version and Matthew’s version above. The versions vary more markedly when Jesus directs his disciples to say For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory. This phrase does not appear in any of three synoptic gospels where Lord’s prayer occurs [Matthew 6:9–13 ; Mark 11:25–26 ; Luke 11: 2–4 ]. Nor does there appear to be a textually reliable way to discern which phrases might best be included in an idealized original version.

Where Did This Pray Come From?


The exact origins of The Lord’s Prayer are difficult to pin down. Historians know it was in use by at least 100 AD and is, therefore, one of the oldest prayers in existence. Many scholars believe it originated with Jesus and that Jesus himself used it (Matthew 6:9). Since Christianity’s early days, though, other cultures have altered certain parts or created entirely new versions. For example, Buddhists have The Three Refuges prayer; Muslims have The Morning Greeting prayer. Even Satanists adapted a version of The Lord’s Prayer into their religion!

Why Does it End With For Thine Is The Kingdom, And The Power, And The Glory, For Ever And Ever? Amen. ?


The Lord’s Prayer has gone through a number of changes over its long history. In fact, while it appears in Matthew and Luke, it is missing from Mark’s gospel. Originally written in Aramaic, one translation of which was found on a tablet dating back to 150 B.C., Matthew and Luke’s version may have actually been translated from an even earlier Greek text. The prayer has also been shortened over time to make it easier for others to recite—though apparently not during that part of Sunday morning worship service when everyone is supposed to bow their heads! As for why it ends with Amen – if you grew up saying grace before meals as most American children do, you might recognize Amen as meaning so be it. But what does that mean? To Christians who take Jesus at his word and believe he came to fulfill God’s covenant with us—which includes justice, freedom and peace; so be it. Amen.
*note: The above info is all copy/pasted directly from Wikipedia – I don’t know how much these facts are common knowledge among religious people

What Are Some Quotes About This Prayer?


The Lord’s Prayer is a prayer recited by many Christians around the world. The Bible records Jesus Christ teaching it to his disciples in Luke 11:1-4 and Matthew 6:9-13. As you study these ten interesting facts about The Lord’s Prayer, you will learn some valuable lessons from its history and meaning. Hopefully these facts will encourage you to incorporate The Lord’s Prayer into your daily life!

What Do These Verses Mean?


In Mark chapter 11, Jesus taught his disciples in a house. After he was betrayed and arrested, these verses were added to his teaching. At that point, Judas had already left with 30 pieces of silver to betray Jesus—so it’s possible that in verse 5, when Jesus said one of you will betray me he was talking about Judas! Today many Christians include an additional verse as part of their Lord’s prayer: For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory forever. Amen. Many churches use For yours is instead of For thine is. Both make sense if read literally; others say that thine means God’s, so we should pray for what God has given us rather than for more things.

Conclusion


The Lord’s prayer is one of the oldest prayers in existence. It was spoken by Jesus and has been prayed for over 2000 years. The words have a lot of meaning to those who pray it and even more to those who study it.

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